Clean Energy for EU: Ireland as island project

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Signed by: Croatia, Cyprus, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Malta, Portugal, Spain, and Sweden

This initiative was originally announced as part of the Commission’s ‘Clean Energy for All Europeans’ package of proposals in November 2016.

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What makes for winners in the Texas wind power boom?

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https://www.marketplace.org/2017/05/22/sustainability/what-makes-for-winners-in-texas-wind-power-boom

What makes for winners in the Texas wind power boom?

By Andy Uhler

May 22, 2017 | 6:55 AM

John Dudley lives in Comanche, Texas, and wears a couple of hats: He’s a cattle rancher and a wind farmer. We met on his 20,000 acres in the Texas hill country. His land holds more than half of the 87 turbines that make up the vast Logan’s Gap Wind Farm. His brown Herefords roam among the giant stalks, as they spin up to 40 stories overhead.

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The alternative to Fracking – for the public and farmers

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Solar Photovoltaic panels and Power Diverter:  electricity and hot water all in one!

Still no feed in tarif for solar energy (electricity) – no grants on Solar Photovoltaic panels The public is investing in clean energy. The Government should encourage this and divest from fossil fuels or imported LNG (fracked gas from the US)

No tor Fracking – Yes to Solar.

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windmills

Did you know that the energy from the windfarms in the midlands(in Ireland) is transported to the UK, so that the UK can comply with the EU regulations to have 20% of their energy from renewable sources?
They prefer Ireland, because regulations in Ireland are less strict than in the UK
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Fossil fuel firms accused of renewable lobby takeover to push gas

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A recent article in The Guardian exposed the fact that the renewables lobby – EWEA for the wind power sector – has been hjjacked by the gas industry. I checked the story with several contacts and it is accurate reporting.

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Ireland’s Energy: What’s the right policy for a recovering economy?

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Ireland’s Energy: What’s the right policy for a recovering economy?
http://www.irishtimes.com/news/environment/ireland-s-energy-what-s-the-right-policy-for-a-recovering-economy-1.2113233

Carbon dioxide emissions fell in the recession but are now rising again. Without dramatic policy changes, Ireland won’t achieve its targets

Ireland needs to diversify its fuel sources and not depend on coal-fired power stations such as Moneypoint. Photograph: Neil Warner for ESBIreland needs to diversify its fuel sources and not depend on coal-fired power stations such as Moneypoint. Photograph: Neil Warner for ESB

Tue, Feb 24, 2015, 10:13

It is eight years since the publication of the last White Paper on Energy. Since then, there has been a major acceleration of renewable energy. Capacity has been increased and an all-island energy market with Northern Ireland has been created. Big strides have also been made on energy efficiency, from better building regulations and energy-efficient incentives for homes to a dramatic lowering in emissions from cars.

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Ireland energy crisis

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Ireland’s energy crisis – http://www.irishtimes.com/news/environment/ireland-s-energy-crisis-1.2111299

Energy is not one of Ireland’s strengths: we import almost 90 per cent of our power, we’ve made little progress in renewables, and we’re at the mercy of an unstable global market. Where will Ireland get its energy in years to come?

Besides worries about climate change and security of supply, Ireland faces a capacity issue. Photograph: EirgridBesides worries about climate change and security of supply, Ireland faces a capacity issue. Photograph: Eirgrid

A nuclear reactor is unlikely ever to dominate the landscape of Carnsore, Co Wexford. In Co Leitrim not a single rock has been fracked – and none might ever be. Yet nuclear power and hydraulic fracturing are already in Ireland.

And although a large part of the population doesn’t want these two controversial power sources anywhere on the island, our purchase of their product is why energy is cheaper now than it has been for almost a decade.

Ireland imports electricity derived from nuclear power from the UK through the East West Interconnector, an underground and submarine power cable that runs between north Wales and Rush, Co Dublin, connecting Ireland and Britain’s electricity grids. In time we will tap into cheap nuclear power from France and elsewhere through new interconnectors.

Shale oil and gas derived from the fracking process have had an indirect but significant effect too. As the former minister for energy Pat Rabbitte puts it, “The shale-gas revolution has transformed the US, which is now heading towards self-sufficiency.”

The emergence of shale oil and gas has led to a dramatic fall in global prices, currently reflected in cheaper petrol in filling stations. The corollary has been less demand for US coal, and its price has also dropped on international markets.

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Nuclear, fracking, wind and wave: nine ways to power Ireland

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Nuclear, fracking, wind and wave: nine ways to power Ireland

We’re afraid of fracking, we don’t like wind turbines and we don’t have enough oil. Any chance we might cut down on energy usage?
http://www.irishtimes.com/news/environment/nuclear-fracking-wind-and-wave-nine-ways-to-power-ireland-1.2111296

Sat, Feb 21, 2015, 00:01

1 Pumped-storage hydro

Six years ago a simple idea was proposed by a Dublin-based scientist, one that, on paper at least, would leave Ireland awash with clean, zero-carbon electricity. It promised to make us major exporters of power, sending current into Britain via the existing two subsea interconnectors to Wales and Scotland. Continue reading