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screenshot once it is brokenThe evidence is here, there, everywhere!
This website aims to be a source for everyone who is concerned, wants to learn more about the invasion of fracking, in Ireland, in Europe…… all over the world! Browse around and below some tips that might be helpful  to find what you are looking for.

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FRACKING FREE BED IN BARN (ad)

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P1010193 1200 233Fed up with Fracking?
Take a break at our Guaranteed Fracking Free Bed in Barn self catering and eco-friendly accommodation. Hear the birds singing, embrace unspoiled nature, clean water, clean air, gaze at the stars…. enjoy life (again)          http://bedinbarn.com/

Exposed and in the dark about fracking chemicals in Europe

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chemicals

http://fractura-hidraulica.blogspot.com.es/2014/10/exposed-and-in-dark-about-fracking.html

viernes, 24 de octubre de 2014

Exposed and in the dark about fracking chemicals in Europe

The institutions of the European Union do not know what chemical substances are currently being utilized in the hydraulic fracturing process within EU territory. Worse still, they openly admit it is impossible to carry out an adequate risk characterization up to date, because exposure models for such a risk assessment do not exist yet. The plan announced by the Commission to repair this situation looks insufficient. Continue reading

Tamboran in Court – latest news: High Court: no legal challenge

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Tamboran in court list for Friday = today 9.30 a.m.
Campaigners and a reporter from Fracking Free Ireland will be in the HIGH COURT in Belfast today and they got permission to take notes.
Tamboran will sue Ministers Mark Durkan (rejected exploration under permitted developments rights) and Arlene Foster for not extending the exploration licence

(see below)

News just in…Detailed arguments are expected to be made when the case reaches a full hearing. The judge listed the case for a further mention next month.

An expired licence to carry out exploratory shale gas drilling in Co Fermanagh cannot be reinstated through a legal challenge, the High Court heard today. Counsel for Enterprise Minister Arlene Foster claimed action being taken against the termination of the permit could not succeed. An Australian-based mining company that planned to conduct investigations at a former quarry site in Belcoo is seeking to judicially review her decision not to grant an extension. Tamboran has also issued proceedings against Environment Minister Mark H Durkan’s determination that it must apply for full planning permission to carry out test drilling. Protests were staged at the site amid fears the controversial ‘fracking’ technique would be used if large reserves of gas were found. Hydraulic fracturing is the process of extracting natural gas from shale rock layers deep within the earth. Tamboran had planned to drill a 750m deep borehole to establish whether any such process would be commercially viable. Anti-fracking campaigners have expressed fears that this could be the first step towards establishing an industry which may damage the environment and the health of nearby residents. Under the terms of a petroleum licence granted in 2011 Tamboran had three years to either inform the Department of Enterprise, Trade and Investment (DETI) on its decision to drill or drop its plans. Earlier this year the firm was given another six months to complete the first stage of work. But no further extension was granted when that deadline passed at the end of last month. Tamboran stated at the time that it had requested an extension of the deadline after informing DETI of its intention to take legal action Mr Durkan’s rejection of a request to drill a borehole at the site. The company said it has already invested more than £3 million. It also claimed the decision not to grant more time could close the door on a project that could deliver up to 50 years of secure energy supply, in excess of 2,000 jobs and billions of much-needed investment in the local economy. Its legal challenge to the two ministerial decisions was mentioned for the first time in the High Court today. During brief exchanges Tony McGleenan QC, for DETI, questioned the merits of the case against his client. He contended that the licence has expired and cannot be restored, even by the court.

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Fracking Ban Ballot Initiatives Intensify

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County ballot issues to ban fracking could have a large impact outside those counties. And the campaign money being spent on both sides—but primarily by big energy companies—shows how much is at stake.

KernCOuntyCal
The oilfields of Kern County, California, are already seeing a fracking boom. Nearby San Benito and Santa Barbara counties will vote on fracking bans in November. Photo credit: Shutterstock

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TTIP – debate in Brussels with a. o. Friends of the Earth

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Published on 17 Apr 2014
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dSzh7KwQXL4
Transnational Institute, together with Friends of the Earth and the Seattle to Brussels Network, plus representatives of the European Parliament and Commission, consumers and citizen groups from both sides of the Atlantic, shared perspectives on the likely impacts of a deal on our environment. Continue reading

Fracking Waste Water

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WASTE WATER

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/09/140924113521.htm

Concerns that fluids from hydraulic fracturing, or “fracking,” are contaminating drinking water abound. Now, scientists are bringing to light another angle that adds to the controversy. A new study, appearing in the ACS journal Environmental Science & Technology, has found that discharge of fracking wastewaters to rivers, even after passage through wastewater treatment plants, could be putting the drinking water supplies of downstream cities at risk.

William A. Mitch, Avner Vengosh and colleagues point out that the disposal of fracking wastewater poses a major challenge for the companies that use the technique, which involves injecting millions of gallons of fluids into shale rock formations to release oil and gas. The resulting wastewater is highly radioactive and contains high levels of heavy metals and salts called halides (bromide, chloride and iodide). One approach to dealing with this wastewater is to treat it in municipal or commercial treatment plants and then release it into rivers and other surface waters.

The problem is these plants don’t do a good job at removing halides. Researchers have raised concern that halide-contaminated surface water subsequently treated for drinking purposes with conventional methods, such as chlorination or ozonation, could lead to the formation of toxic byproducts. Mitch’s team set out to see if that was indeed the case.

The researchers diluted river-water samples of fracking wastewater discharged from operations in Pennsylvania and Arkansas, simulating real-world conditions when wastewater gets into the environment. In the lab, they then used current drinking-water disinfection methods on the samples. They found that even at concentrations as low as 0.01 percent up to 0.1 percent by volume of fracking wastewater, an array of toxic compounds formed. Based on their findings, the researchers recommend either that fracking wastewater should not be discharged at all into surface waters or that future water treatment include specific halide-removal techniques.

Fracking Threatens Millions of Californians

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Fracking Threatens Millions of Californians

| October 22, 2014 5:29 pm | Comments

A new report shows that 5.4 million Californians—more than 14 percent of its 38.3 million population—live within a mile of an oil or gas well, and almost four million of those, or nearly 70 percent, are Hispanic, Asian or African-American, according to a new Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC) report Drilling in California: Who’s at Risk? Non-whites make up slightly more than 40 percent of California’s total population.
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How Fracking Just Got Worse for Your Health

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How Fracking Just Got Worse for Your Health

Jennifer Sass, Natural Resources Defense Council | October 6, 2014 1:42 pm

  • 1-bromopropane used as a cleaning solvent and in spray adhesives;
  • Pentachlorophenol, a complex mixture used as a wood preservative to treat utility poles;
  • Ortho-Toluidine, used to make rubber chemicals, pesticides, dyes, and some consumer products;
  • Cumene, found in fuel products and tobacco smoke.

Cumene is classified as “reasonably anticipated” to cause cancer. It’s also on the congressional list of chemicals used in hydraulic fracturing or “fracking” for oil and gas. It’s been listed as a Hazardous Air Pollutant (HAP) by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency since 1990, so it’s been known to be bad for health for a long time.

dangerchem
We need more than disclosure of chemical identities. We also need chemicals to be hazard-tested before they are marketed, before they are allowed into commercial products, and before they are allowed to be used in industrial processes where workers and communities can be exposed. Continue reading

TTIP – Fact sheet Trade Unionists

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fact sheet trade unionists 2

What-Irish-Trade-Trade-Unionists-Need-To-Know-About-TTIP (pdf)